Ex-Disney Employee Talks
Use These Rare Insider Secrets to Save Hundreds  of dollars at Disney World.

 

HOME  
Disney Guide Book
Disney Dining
Articles
Disney & Orlando  Resources
Disney Parks 
Disney Resorts
Shopping
Money Saving Travel Resources
Disney Photos
Media
About Us
Contact Us

 

 

 

 

FREE ARTICLE
This Article is Available Free For Reprint - IMPORTANT: See Reprint Policy & Requirements Below the Article.
    Guest Assistance Cards (GAC's)
    Who should get them, how to get them and how to use them
    By Stephen Ashley, author of Walt Disney World with Disabilities

    When you’re dealing with health conditions at Walt Disney World, there’s something you can obtain that can make you’re life go much easier! It’s called a Guest Assistance Card and it’s referred to as a GAC. It allows guests with special needs to receive help from the Disney cast members (Disney’s name for their employees) in the four main Disney parks.  Here’s some of what it can do for you:

     

    • It permits you to utilize a stroller as if it were a wheelchair.  This means that you’ll be able to use the wheelchair queues, entrances and paths with your stroller.  
    • Those who are not in a wheelchair but still need to use the wheelchair entrances and exits will be permitted to do so.  You’ll also have the option of using any special waiting areas for attractions.
    • Those with visual or auditory impairments will have the option of sitting up front where that is available. If you need to make use of this option, try to arrive as early as possible, because seats are not set aside.  If you arrive too late, they may not be able to provide you with seats close to the action, and you may need to wait for the next show. Of course if you do arrive in time and there are seats available, you’ll be given priority.
    • If the regular queue is hot or sunny, and there is an alternative area for that attraction that’s air-conditioned or at least shaded, you’ll be permitted to wait there instead. Keep in mind that Disney does not always provide this type of alternative.
    • You’ll be permitted to speak to the cast member at each attraction, and let them know about your particular needs.  If there’s any way for them to support you, they will do so. 

     

    A GAC can make a big difference when you are dealing with invisible conditions such as ADD/ADHD, heat and sun sensitivity, autism, discomfort with crowds and various phobias.  The Disney employees can support you in a variety of ways. For example, they may allow you to enter the wheelchair queue rather than the main queue. The wheelchair queues are often much quieter and less crowded. You may have a shorter walk. For those with heat and sun sensitivity, whenever it’s available, they can bring you to a waiting area out of the sun. Those who are uncomfortable in crowds may be able to wait in a less crowded area.  

     

    To get a GAC, go to Guest Relations at any one of the four parks. There’s one near the entrance of each park. One GAC is all you need for all four parks on the date(s) specified on the GAC.  They can issue you a card which will be valid for your full stay, so be sure to request this. If you’re an Annual Pass Member, you can get one card which will last up to three months. After three months you will need to get a new one. The GAC will usually allow the person that the card is for to bring as many as five companions along with them for each attraction. Be sure to let the Guest Relations representative know the exact number of people in your group.

     

    There are several different types of GACs that are assigned based on your specific issues. Rather than informing the cast member about the particular diagnosis’s involved, you’ll be describing your needs to them.  For example, you can tell the cast member that you need to stay out of the sun.  They will then give you the most suitable GAC for your situation. Before you leave Guest Relations, be certain that you’ve got a full understanding of what support your GAC allows for.

     

    When you go to Guest Relations, it’s important to have the person who needs the Guest Assistance Card with you. The cast member will want to make sure that they’re really at the park that day.

     

    When requesting a GAC, it’s absolutely not required for you to bring proof the illness.  However we have found that it can make the process much easier if the illness is not visible, depending on the cast member. In fact, we have heard of people being denied a GAC because the condition was not visible. Unfortunately there are people who try to fake an illness to get a GAC because they think it will help them avoid lines and I'll talk about that below. However, for this reason, Disney has had to be careful.

     

    Although the Disney policy is that no proof is needed, we’ve noticed that over the years it has become increasingly difficult to get a GAC, so we’ve brought proof.  However once my wife Sarah began using a wheelchair we’ve found that it has been very easy to get a GAC.  I suspect this is because they can see visible evidence of a health issue.  

     

    There are a variety of things you can do. In the past, we’ve shown them a doctor’s note that was written for another reason. Once we even brought a photocopy of a legal document that confirmed my wife Sarah’s health problem.  A doctor’s note describing your specific needs can make things go smoothly. It’s not necessary to state a diagnosis.  Just have him focus on what kind of help and support you need.

     

    Should you decide to bring a doctor’s note, the following is a sample of might be written on it.  Of course it must be signed and on her/his professional letterhead:

     

    This note concerns __________.  She/he has difficulty [with crowds, sitting, standing, walking (describe your challenge)...]  This condition will make it difficult for her/him to stand in lines.  Whenever possible please provide an alternative so that the need for this will be reduced.  Also, she/he should avoid the sun and should stay in an air-conditioned environment whenever possible.  Please provide any support you can.

     

    Regards,

     

    Doctor XXXXX

     

    Though it’s rare, we’ve happened upon a Guest Relations representative who was not familiar with GACs.  The best thing to do is to politely ask for a supervisor. Don’t spend a moment of your precious vacation time trying to explain or argue.  There should be someone else there who will be able to easily give you what you need.  

     

    Those in wheelchairs or electric convenience vehicles (ECVs) may not really need to obtain a GAC. You’ll be allowed to utilize all of the park, ride and attraction wheelchair entrances and queues.  If an attraction allows wheelchairs on the ride car or in a theater, you’ll automatically be permitted to stay in your wheelchair. Yet if you have other needs, the cast members are not under any type of obligation to support you if you don’t have a GAC.  For example, if you’re in a wheelchair and want to stay out of the sun, the cast member may or may not help you without a GAC.  Though we find that some cast members will help wheelchair users with these special requests even when they don’t have a GAC, we recommend that you request one. It increases the likelihood that you’ll get what you need!

     

    Those who need to use a stroller as a wheelchair will need to request a GAC. If you don’t have a GAC that states this, you will not be permitted to use the stroller in queues or on rides.  Also, you will not be permitted to use the wheelchair entrances unless you have a GAC.

     

    Most people have the idea that a GAC will shorten their wait times while getting them to the head of the line.  While this does sometimes occur, for many attractions we’ve found that we’ve actually had a significantly longer wait time. More typically, we’ve waited about the same amount of time as those without GACs. 

     

    Each attraction has different procedures, and the cast members will be able to support guests with GACs in various ways.  There’s usually a cast member at the front of each attraction.  Just show them your GAC, let them know what you need and they’ll usually let you know what the procedures are for that attraction. 

     

    On the rare occasion that a cast member doesn’t help you as fully as you need, request to speak with a supervisor.  Now and then you’ll encounter a cast member who’s lacking in training, experience or perhaps even sensitivity.  A supervisor will almost always be able to take better care of you. 

     

    Have a relaxing and wonderful time on your dream vacation!  

     

    Stephen Ashley is the author of Walt Disney World with Disabilities: Unofficial in-depth planning guide for your fun, comfort and safety, designed for minor to major health conditions. The book is available through Amazon.com and the official website called Walt Disney World for Everyone™ at www.Diz-Abled.com.  Also visit this site for the extensive free information designed to help people plan a great vacation at Disney World with health and emotional conditions, special needs and disabilities. 

     
    © 2007-2009 Ball Media Innovations, Inc. This article may be reproduced for free with the above credit paragraph, this copyright information and the link to www.Diz-Abled.com live and intact.

     

    Reprint Policy: This article may be freely reproduced in print and online publications provided the following conditions are met:

    It must be reproduced in full, with no changes or omissions, including the author information and link to the www.Diz-Abled.com web site in the last paragraph. If the article is used on the web, a live link to www.Diz-Abled.com must be included. 

    The Ball Media Innovations, Inc. copyright notice must be included. The copyright notice may be at the beginning or the end of the article. 

    Advance permission is not required.  

    If you would like the article changed or customized in any way we would be happy to do that for you.  We would also be happy to create a unique and new article for you.  Just email us! Thank you!
     

     

     

    Or to read more about Walt Disney World with Disabilities click here
    DISCOUNT TRAVEL - BOOK YOUR TRIP
     
    Travelocity: Top Hotel Deals in Orlando - One of the most powerful one-stop travel sites. Make reservations for air, car, hotel and packages.

     

     
    Family Vacations- General (120x60)
     
    Orbitz: Disney World Hotels and Packages - Another major discount site offering flights, hotels and cars, as well as packages.
     
    lastminute.com logo
     www.lastminute.com - This site brings you the best deals available at the last minute so you can go this weekend and save up to 70%. 
     
    Priceline.com: Hotels - save up to 50% Name your own price on hotels, or book at posted discount rates. You can get flights, hotels and cars, as well as packages.
     

    Hotels.com offers some of the best prices. You'll find rooms for sold-out dates, rebates and many options for leisure and business travel for every budget.

 

 

 

Advertise on Diz-Abled.com

  Privacy Policy     Disclaimer    Terms of  Use     

This site is for Walt Disney World dealing with issues for handicapped, special needs, disabilities, disabled, back pain, allergies, autism, epilepsy, diabetics, wheelchair & scooter, asthma, attention deficit disorder, pregnant, hearing impairment, deaf, visual impairment, blind, chronic fatigue, fibromyalgia, motion sickness, oxygen, vertigo, phobias, fears, high blood pressure, heart problems, Alzheimer's, gluten free diet, handicap, illness, dialysis, and more.

 

We are not affiliated, associated, authorized, endorsed by, or in any way officially connected with The Walt Disney Company, Disney Enterprises, Inc., or any of its subsidiaries or its affiliates. The official Disney web site is available at www.disney.com.   All Disney parks, attractions, lands, shows, event names, etc. are registered trademarks of The Walt Disney Company.
 
©Copyright 2007-2009 Ball Media Innovations, Inc.  All rights reserved.  No part of this website and/or book may be copied without permission.  This website, book, or parts thereof, may not be reproduced in any form without permission from the author.